Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Lost Resume #2

Hello, friends! I know it is a Tuesday, and I am not normally here on the blog, but this week is special, being the lead-up to the release of my upcoming picture book, HELP WANTED, MUST LOVE BOOKS (illustrated by Courtney Dawson).

This week I'm sharing 5 Lost Resumes from characters who both did and didn't make it into my story. I hope you enjoyed Snow White's Lost Resume from yesterday. If not, you can find it HERE. Today we are moving on to Lost Resume #2: Captain Hook!


I really liked this resume. The tricky part on this one was that I needed to be careful not to confuse the Captain Hook character from J.M. Barrie's book, with the one from the Disney movie. As such, I was forced into the extra work of reading the original PETER PAN (sometimes an author's job is tough,* but as a professional, one carries on).

The reason this resume was not included,** is because after I sent in the eight resumes for consideration, I was asked to replace another character in the book. They felt the original character was too controversial for schools.

Can you guess who that character might be? I'll give you a hint. It involved hygiene, and it was a male character. (I'm going to be honest here, I don't think you'll guess who it was! πŸ˜‚) Anyway, Captain Hook became the replacement. Since we wanted resumes from characters who were not already in the book, the resume fell out of the running.

Yesterday, I said I might tell you who Snow White (and the 7 Dwarves) replaced, but since no one parried a guess, I will hold off until the end of the week. I gave no hint yesterday, but I'll give one today. She replaced someone who also brought along a group, and who was in a nursery rhyme instead of a fairy tale. (My hints don't make it easy, do they? πŸ˜‚)

Have a wonderful week! And be sure to come back tomorrow when I share Lost Resume #3! In the meantime, don't forget to enter my giveaway for a chance to win a copy of my book, and a copy of a book by one of my fellow Debut Crew members!

If you don't want to wait, and just want to pre-order a copy of my book (I can hardly blame you for that!), you can find it on bookshop.org, which helps support local indie bookstores. Or if you don't have a local indie, you can always find it on Amazon or B&N.

*I'm kidding, this part of the job is not tough at all. I LOVE when I'm forced to read a good book. πŸ˜‰

**Well, one major reason, anyway . . . I don't actually know all the reasons my publisher chose the four they did. I can only guess.

Monday, February 24, 2020

Countdown to Release Day (plus a giveaway!)

I don't know how this happened, but my picture book, HELP WANTED, MUST LOVE BOOKS (illustrated by Courtney Dawson), officially releases in exactly one week from today! (Aaaaaahhh!!) With the countdown to release day in full-swing, I wanted to share a little behind-the-scenes fun (and then host a giveaway!).

The first time I chatted with my editor at Capstone, my editor asked me what I thought about possibly including some back matter in the book. She couldn't have known, but I am a BIG FAN of all things back matter in fiction picture books. I leapt at the chance!

Ideas came swimming into my head immediately. I told her I had a lot of characters who didn't make the cut in the book. What if we did some character resumes for those lost characters?

She loved the idea, and so I got right to work, and sent her a sample later that week. That sample---a resume for Pinocchio---is now published in the final pages of my book. In fact, there are FOUR character resumes at the end of my book. I hope you'll love them! (Here's the tiniest sneak peeks.)

But guess what? I wrote way more than that. Yep. I wasn't sure what Capstone would like, so I sent them 8 to choose from. But I wrote even more resumes than that . . . because I only sent them the 8 best ones. So over the course of this week, I'm going to be sharing FIVE of those lost resumes over the course of this week! Eventually, they will be available for download on my website, but for now, here is LOST RESUME #1 for your viewing pleasure. May I present SNOW WHITE!



Snow White did not make the cut because I didn't think this resume was quite as amusing as the others. Thus, I never sent this one to my editor. In the end, it was just as well because Snow White, who hadn't been featured in my book at the time of that initial phone call, went on to replace a different character. Oh, the intrigue in the fairy tale world!

Who got replaced you ask? Take your best guess in the comments! I'd love to hear. And maybe I'll answer that question when I share the next Lost Resume! I'll add the links here as they're available:

Lost Resume #2
Lost Resume #3
Lost Resume #4
Lost Resume #5

But now, on to more fun stuff. With my release date being so close, I must, of course, celebrate with a giveaway!

So, to one lucky winner, I am giving not only a copy of my book, but a copy of a picture book written by a member of the 2020 Debut Crew (one book of your choice!)!! You can find a list of the authors and their books HERE. If the book you choose is not yet released, I will pre-order a copy of their book for you.

Entries close on Saturday, February 28th at midnight EST.

For all you international blog followers, this giveaway is open to every country where Book Depository delivers.  If you aren't certain about your country, check it out HERE.

For any U.S. followers, I will gladly send a signed copy of my book upon request. If you win, just let me know!

Just use the handy dandy Rafflecopter link below to enter. Good luck, my friends!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Monday, February 17, 2020

Author Interview: Elisavet Arkolaki


I'm so excited to welcome Elisavet Arkolaki on my blog today! She is the author of picture book WHERE AM I FROM? which is illustrated by Platon, a graffiti artist.

I met Elisavet through our debut group, and it's been fascinating to watch the process of her book. I was so fortunate to get to read her book in advance. Without further ado, let's get talking! (As always, I'm in the bolded, green text.)

Hi Elisavet, Welcome to my blog! Can you tell us a little about yourself and how you came to write children's books?

Hi Janet, thank you for inviting me here. I was born and raised in Greece, my husband in Norway, our first kid was born in Malta and our second in Norway. We speak three languages at home. I also lived in France and Spain prior to becoming a mum, and most European winters with the kids have been spent in Thailand. I grew up in a monolingual and rather monocultural society, where other languages were taught as 'foreign languages', thus the way I experienced the world during my formative years was very different from our children's. Thus, it's very high on my list to better understand their world view and offer them adequate support on their journey. My favorite medium to explore emotions, concepts, and ideas has always been writing thus it was only natural that I've now turned to write children's stories. I also curated a complimentary guide titled 'How to Raise Confident Multicultural Children' as a resource for parents, caregivers, and teachers which they can download by subscribing to my newsletter list HERE.

Wow! That is an impressive mix of countries, languages, and cultures. So I have to ask . . . I'm guessing you speak Greek, Norwegian, and English in your home. Is that right?

Yes. My husband speaks Norwegian with the kids, I speak Greek with the kids, and the common family language is English. 

So amazing. Well, I love that your kids are at the heart of your writing. Can you tell us about your book?

Through stunning murals by artist Platon, ‘Where am I from?’ will take our young ones on a quest in search of common origins. It's a fun story, crafted for preschoolers and early readers. It portrays children with different racial and ethnic backgrounds, living in countries from all six inhabited continents. The children gather together and try to find a universal answer to the question 'Where am I from?', an answer which isn't true just for them but true for everyone.

I feel that this book helps promote the idea that, in the end, when it comes to the very basics, we're all connected. It's during early childhood that many of our attitudes and beliefs towards others are shaped, and we form a perception of the world around us. It is therefore at this young age we should start introducing these ideas if we want our kids to grow up and create a better world than we have done so far.  

I wholeheartedly agree. We all have so much in common no matter where we happen to live. What inspired you to write WHERE AM I FROM?

Living an international life, I find it hard to answer 'Where are you from?' even if I grew up in one country. Almost half of my life has been lived abroad, my husband is from another country, we communicate and have formed our relationship and so many friendships in 'foreign' languages. 'Where are you from?' is truly a difficult question for so many people, and it implies you're not local.

If you had asked me "where are you from?", for instance, the first time I moved abroad, I would have answered from Greece. I would have probably done the same the second time I moved to a foreign country. Since then, things have gotten blurry. I still answer from Greece, but only for the sake of simplicity. In my case, it's not a question that makes me feel uncomfortable, I just don't know how to answer any more in a way that won't sound like an essay. Being pointed out as a foreigner is not an issue for me but if I find it confusing, how would a child feel? How will my children feel when they are asked this question? Children are vulnerable. They need to blend in, be part of the group and they need to feel local.

Once questions starting popping up at the dinner table about our countries of origin, the places we've lived, where our families and friends live, our travels, and the countries of the world, I felt I needed to be proactive and prepare them for the future. Soon other people would ask them questions. So I came up with the story Where am I from?.

However, the actual thread that began this story is found on a backpacking trip in Australia back in 2009 while I was riding a bus and listening to a local radio station. A journalist was asking tourists "Where do you come from?" I heard all sorts of cities and countries until he approached a mum and her young boy. He asked the boy ‘So, where do you come from?’ The boy replied the obvious, ‘I come from my mum’s belly’. I never forgot that phrase. It was genius in its simplicity. So this is from where I started developing this story: from the very end of it.
😊

That answer is genius. We are all connected, and sometimes it takes a child to see it. Speaking of children, I love how the children in your book have come from all over the world. Are any of them inspired by children you know?

When I was writing the story I chose countries from all 6 inhabited continents. The choice was made based on countries that are dear to me like Malta and Norway where my children have been born. I chose countries where friends of mine have been born or live like Venezuela and Nigeria. Others are from countries like China where I would love to visit one day, plus I felt the words would flow nicely within the story. Australia, as mentioned, is where the seed for this story got planted.

Then, in order to check whether there was indeed a market for such a book that would be illustrated entirely with spray paint graffiti murals, I ran a Kickstarter campaign. It would be a very time consuming, costly, and difficult project so we needed to make sure people would be interested in it, and that it was worth the effort. Because of that, all the kids that you see in the book are based on real kids. Their parents commissioned the art, and all characters except one are based on people of mixed cultural heritage; even the mum and the baby characters. 

That is so cool! What a gift from those parents to their kids. So in conjunction with that, I love that they all travel by animals or mythical creatures. Why did you decide to do that, and how did you choose their animals?

This was actually the editor's idea while we were working on the structure of the story (developmental editing phase). Originally, I had included the lion, the troll and the kangaroo, but there weren't animals and other creatures in every scene. She suggested it would really fire up the imagination of the kids and would make the book more interesting both visually and from a narrative point of view, and I agreed. I wanted us to use characters and landmarks that were part of the fauna, the history, the culture and/or mythology of each land like the gorgeous Chinese dragon, the jaguar in Venezuela and the troll in Norway.



I love that! And thank you for the sneak peek for my readers! Good thing for editors, right? So what takeaway do you hope readers will get from your book?

My wish is that the children will grasp how beautiful, colorful and diverse our world is. I hope they will discover that we all have common origins that go far beyond arbitrary borders on a map, borders which often move. There is, indeed, a universal answer to the question 'Where am I from?' I would also love this book to initiate a dialogue between adults and children about art and the different mediums and tools people use to express themselves. Street art, in particular, is a very powerful medium to express ideas and reach out to the broader public. I love that most of the graffiti has been painted in schools and the kids will get to see gorgeous art every day. 

The art is brilliant, and those kids really are lucky! How did you come up with the idea of using graffiti art for the images? It's so beautiful and I really wish I could see the originals!

It feels like everything is connected. Early 2009 I wrote my very first commissioned magazine article as a correspondent from Barcelona, Spain. It was a piece about Miss Van, a street artist from France who has been residing for many years in Barcelona. I grew up in a big city, Athens (5,000,000 people), and I've been influenced by urban art. I've always loved graffiti in its pure art form. Fast forward to 2017: I was toying with the idea of having my first children's book illustrated with street art and discussing it with Platon, the husband of my oldest childhood friend, who's a very talented street artist.

From a creative standpoint, and to our knowledge, spray paint graffiti has not been used as a medium for illustrating a children's picture book in English. And I can totally see why. Not only does it require an enormous amount of time, but it's also very physically challenging to be out there painting so many walls, and not just for the obvious reasons like having to stand up for hours. Did you know for instance that spray paint attracts mosquitos? lol.

Umm, no. I did NOT know that. Yikes!

Also, having a background in marketing, I sensed that graffiti art would help us bring the message across in an effective, powerful way, that would also make the book newsworthy. As a side effect, it could challenge the belief shared by many that street art is just 'vandalism'. I remember an online 'argument' on Facebook with a guy who commented under a photo of one of our murals that 'this is not graffiti', and when I asked him why he said that, he replied, "cause this is art." There is still this misconception that graffiti is just ugly tags.





Clearly, graffiti can be beautiful, and your book is already changing minds! And I just love getting a glimpse of the real-life image as painted on the wall.

Okay, one last question. Here on my blog, I have a fascination for personalized license plates. What do you think the children in your story might choose for a personalized license plate (even though they are definitely all too young to drive!)? (And do they have personalized license plates in Norway?)

That's a funny one :). My best guess would be 'Future Global Citizen'. I have no idea if they do personalized license plates in Norway. Is it a thing in the USA?

Haha! Fair question. But it is definitely a thing in the USA. 😊

Thanks so much for stopping in. This was all fascinating! Wishing you and your book all the best! And to all my readers, please find Elisavet's social media links below, as well as links for where you can get your own copy of WHERE AM I FROM?

~~~
Elisavet Arkolaki is the author of the graffiti-illustrated children's picture book WHERE AM I FROM? (Faraxa Publishing, early 2020). The trickiest question you can ask Elisavet and her family is ‘Where are you from?’ because they are from everywhere! Passionate about travel and inspired by global learning, she raises her own children in between countries, cultures, and languages. She writes to build cultural understanding and sensitivity in young children while they are still eager to learn.

You can follow her on TwitterGoodreadsFacebook, Instagram, and her Website.

WHERE AM I FROM? is available through Amazon (Hardcover, Paperback, Kindle) and Faraxa Publishing 

Monday, February 10, 2020

Author Interview: Aya Khalil


I've always said that one of the best part about being an author is meeting other authors and getting to read their books and stories (sometimes a little early!). 

With my own picture book coming out in 2020, I was fortunate to meet several other debut picture book authors. One of them is Aya Khalil. Her book THE ARABIC QUILT: An Immigration Story, illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan, releases February 18th.

I got to read her book in advance, and am so excited to have her on my blog today. So please welcome Aya Khalil! (As always, I'll be in bolded green text.)

Hi Aya, Welcome to my blog!

Hi! Thanks for having me. 

I'd love to learn more about you. Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Sure, I am a freelance journalist and educator with my debut picture book coming out in February. I live in Northwest Ohio with my three children and husband. 

Wow, three jobs (counting author)! That is not easy, especially with kids. And huge congratulations on your book. I'm so excited for it's release. Please tell us about it.

My book is about a beautiful girl named Kanzi who recently immigrated to the US from Egypt. She tries so hard to fit in but the teasing really gets to her. With the help of her teacher and mom, she learns to appreciate her language and culture. 


It's so hard to remember what's important when you're young . . . especially in the face of teasing. I loved that Kanzi had so many supportive adults in her life. Kids need that! I'd love to know what inspired you to write The Arabic Quilt: An Immigrant Story.
  
My picture book is based on true stories growing up as an immigrant. I moved to the US when I was one with my parents and brother. We attended a mostly all-white school in a rural town in North Dakota. We had incredible teachers there and especially this one teacher who thought of this lesson one day. She asked me, with the help of my mom, to write down our classmates' names in Arabic. My classmates thought their names in Arabic were so cool! So they each copied their names on their own and the teacher hung them up as a quilt. This happened over 20 years ago and just comes to show how powerful teachers can be, especially to their minority students. 
 
What a lovely and inclusive lesson plan! Teachers have such an influence and can do so much good. And I love that you used your own life stories to inspire you. What advice would you give to beginning writers about finding ideas?

Write down ideas all the time! Whether it's a blog or even on your Notes app, write down encounters or situations. Maybe you will end up making it into a book some day.

Great advice! You never know what might inspire a story. 

Above you mentioned you do freelance journalism. Have you always wanted to write? And how did you get into writing picture books?

I read to my kids often and used to review picture books and I always thought it would be so neat to get my words out there to young children. With my background in journalism my published work was usually geared towards adults. 

Well, I'm so glad you took the plunge! The Arabic Quilt is a beautiful story that will no doubt resonate with a lot of kids! 

Thanks! 

As a new author what is the most surprising thing you've learned about being an author?

That it takes A LONG TIME! I was always so used to the fast-paced world of journalism and quick responses and quick edits and quick publishing times! Ha! That's not always the case in the picture book industry.

Haha! No, it is not. Such a stark contrast between the two industries. Patience is definitely needed for the book publishing world.
Okay, one last question. Here on my blog, I have a fascination for personalized license plates. What do you think Kanzi would put on her license plate (even though she's definitely too young to drive!)?

QuiltTheHate (Like quit the hate but with the word quilt instead)

How perfect! And I'm guessing that after your book releases, there will be a lot of classes making their own quilts, just like Kanzi's class.

Thank you again for stopping in and answering some questions!


Thank you so much for asking these great questions!

Best wishes for your book! And to all my readers, please find Aya's social media links below, as well as links for where you can get your own copy of THE ARABIC QUILT!

~~~
Aya Khalil is a freelance journalist and educator. She holds a master's degree in Education with a focus in Teaching English as a Second Language. THE ARABIC QUILT is based on true events growing up, when she moved to the US from EGYPT at the age of one. Her articles have been published in The Huffington Post, The Christian Science Monitor, The Post & Courier, Toledo Area Parent, and more. She's been featured in Yahoo!, Teen Vogue, Verona and more. www.ayakhalil.com

You can follow her on Twitter, Goodreads, Facebook, and Instagram.

THE ARABIC QUILT: an immigration story is available for pre-order from your local indie book store (find it at IndieBound), from Amazon, B&N, and wherever books are sold.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Multicultural Children's Book Day Review: Dictionary for a Better World


I'm thrilled to be participating in Multicultural Children's Book Day this year! The second book I was gifted to review for the event is DICTIONARY FOR A BETTER WORLD, written by Irene Latham Charles Waters, and illustrated by Penny Weber. It is published by Lerner Books.

Description: 

How can we make the world a better place? This inspiring resource for middle-grade readers is organized as a dictionary; each entry presents a word related to creating a better world, such as ally, empathy, or respect. For each word, there is a poem, a quote from an inspiring person, a personal anecdote from the authors, and a "try it" prompt for an activity.


My Review:

Dictionary for a Better World is a series of poems with titles that begin with "A" (such as "Acceptance"), and continue through all the letters of the alphabet with one or two poems for each letter. Some of the poems are written by Irene Latham, and some are written by Charles Waters, and some are written by both.

I loved so much about this book. I loved that there was an explanation of the poem type for every poem in the book. It really help me (a poetry novice) understand the what the author of each poem was trying to accomplish. And not only are the poems beautifully written, but they are perfectly accessible for kids.


I loved that the author of the poem would share something from their life (and usually their childhood) that inspired them to work on the attribute discussed in the poem. It was really fascinating to learn more about both authors as you moved through the book.

I loved that there was an action for each attribute . . . a way for the reader to get involved and to improve themselves by trying something new. There are so many good ideas for ways to improve ourselves in this book!

Finally, I loved the illustrations. So many different types of art are on display throughout the pages, and it is beautiful. I love how the page formatting works with the words and theme of the poem. Just beautifully put together as a whole.

This book is not the type of book you devour in one sitting (although you could). This book is meant to be savored. To make you think. It encourages its readers to consider not just the ideas that are presented, but to move and to act. As a reader, I wanted time to think and reflect, and so I read a poem or two before going to bed each night. It was so inspiring, and so lovely to fall asleep thinking about how I could make myself and the world, a better place.

~~~

Irene Latham is the author of more than a dozen current and forthcoming works of poetry, fiction, and picture books, including Charlotte Huck Honor Book Can I Touch Your Hair? Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship (co-written with Charles Waters). Winner of the 2016 ILA Lee Bennett Hopkins Promising Poet Award, she became obsessed with octopuses after reading The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery. Just like Agnes, she enjoys sending—and receiving—postcards. Visit her at www.irenelatham.com.


Charles Waters is a children’s poet, actor, and co-author of Charlotte Huck Honor Book Can I Touch Your Hair? Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship. His poems have appeared in various anthologies including One Minute Till Bedtime and The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry. Charles performs his one-person show as well as conducts poetry performance and writing workshops for elementary and middle school audiences. He lives in New York City.


Mehrdokht Amini is an Iranian-British children’s book illustrator living in England. She graduated with a degree in Graphic Design from Tehran University and has worked as an illustrator for both educational and mainstream publishers ever since. She started her career in Iran while still studying at university, working on various projects for children’s magazines and books. After moving to England in 2004 she continued working with publishers all around the world. Mehrdokht loves working with publishers who are interested in cultural diversity because it gives her an excellent opportunity to undertake a close study of different cultures and communities, gain a better understanding of those cultures and appreciate people of different backgrounds to her own.
~~~
Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2020 (1/31/20) is in its 7th year! This non-profit children’s literacy initiative was founded by Valarie Budayr and Mia Wenjen; two diverse book-loving moms who saw a need to shine the spotlight on all of the multicultural books and authors on the market while also working to get those book into the hands of young readers and educators. 


Seven years in, MCBD’s mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves continues.

MCBD 2020  is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board


Super Platinum


Platinum


Gold


Silver


Bronze


Author Sponsor Link Cloud

Jerry CraftA.R. Bey and Adventures in BoogielandEugina Chu & Brandon goes to BeijingKenneth Braswell & Fathers IncorporatedMaritza M. Mejia & Luz del mes_MejiaKathleen Burkinshaw & The Last Cherry BlossomSISSY GOES TINY by Rebecca Flansburg and B.A. NorrgardJosh Funk and HOW TO CODE A ROLLERCOASTERMaya/Neel Adventures with Culture Groove,  Lauren RanalliThe Little Green Monster: Cancer Magic! By Dr. Sharon ChappellPhe Lang and Me On The PageAfsaneh Moradian and Jamie is JamieValerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena PublishingTUMBLE CREEK PRESSNancy Tupper Ling, Author Gwen JacksonAngeliki Pedersen & The Secrets Hidden Beneath the Palm TreeAuthor Kimberly Gordon BiddleBEST #OWNVOICES CHILDREN’S BOOKS: My Favorite Diversity Books for Kids Ages 1-12 by Mia WenjenSusan Schaefer Bernardo & Illustrator Courtenay Fletcher (Founders of Inner Flower Child Books)Ann Morris & Do It Again!/¡Otra Vez!, Janet Balletta and Mermaids on a Mission to Save the OceanEvelyn Sanchez-Toledo & Bruna Bailando por el Mundo\ Dancing Around the WorldShoumi Sen & From The Toddler DiariesSarah Jamila StevensonTonya Duncan and the Sophie Washington Book SeriesTeresa Robeson  & The Queen of Physics, Nadishka Aloysius and Roo The Little Red TukTukGirlfriends Book Club Baltimore & Stories by the Girlfriends Book ClubFinding My Way Books, Diana Huang & IntrepidsFive Enchanted MermaidsElizabeth Godley and Ribbon’s Traveling CastleAnna Olswanger and GreenhornDanielle Wallace & My Big Brother Troy, Jocelyn Francisco and Little Yellow JeepneyMariana Llanos & Kutu, the Tiny Inca Princess/La Γ‘usta DiminutaSara Arnold & The Big Buna BashRoddie Simmons & Race 2 RioDuEwa Frazier & Alice’s Musical DebutVeronica Appleton & the Journey to Appleville book series  Green Kids Club, Inc.

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

A Crafty ArabAfsaneh MoradianAgatha Rodi BooksAll Done MonkeyBarefoot MommyBethany Edward & Biracial BookwormsMichelle Goetzl & Books My Kids ReadCrafty Moms ShareColours of UsDiscovering the World Through My Son’s EyesEducators Spin on itShauna Hibbitts-creator of eNannylinkGrowing Book by BookHere Wee ReadJoel Leonidas & Descendant of Poseidon Reads {Philippines}Imagination SoupKid World CitizenKristi’s Book NookThe LogonautsMama SmilesMiss Panda ChineseMulticultural Kid BlogsSerge Smagarinsky {Australia}Shoumi SenJennifer Brunk & Spanish PlaygroundKatie Meadows and Youth Lit Reviews

FREE RESOURCES from Multicultural Children’s Book Day


TWITTER PARTY! Register here!




Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Multicultural Children's Book Day Review: Sissy Goes Tiny

I'm thrilled to be participating in Multicultural Children's Book Day this year! The first book I was gifted to review for the event is SISSY GOES TINY, written by Rebecca Flansburg BA Norrgard, and illustrated by Penny Weber. It is published by Audrey Press.

Description: 

Eight-year-old Sissy loves her life. She loves her toys, her Big house, and her Big backyard. But when Sissy’s parents decide they are going to live in a Tiny House on wheels and travel around the U.S., Sissy isn’t sure that she will like the idea of “living tiny.” But as she and her mommy and daddy learn about downsizing, repurposing, and how “stuff is just stuff” in a positive way, Sissy soon understands that living Tiny has BIG possibilities; possibilities for all sorts of adventures and learning.

My Review:

I have long been fascinated by the "Go Tiny" movement and those who have chosen to live that way. Sissy Goes Tiny gives beautiful insight into why a person or family might choose to change their lives so dramatically. In this book, Sissy loves her life. She loves her big room, and big house, and big yard. So she is a little alarmed when her parents come tell her they will be moving into a smaller, movable house that they can take with them wherever they decide to go.

I have to confess. I felt Sissy's alarm. I imagined how I would feel if, as a kid, I were asked to give up the place I loved, where I'd grown up. Honestly, I feel that alarm even as an adult. But I loved the way the book takes the reader through the process of going from Big to Small. It is about focusing on having fewer things, but more experiences. And that is definitely something I can understand wanting more of.


While I am not ready to go tiny myself, this book helped me to understand those who are. It helped me to understand why someone might choose to go tiny. And understanding how someone else feels creates empathy, which is always a good thing. Sissy Goes Tiny would be a great book for anyone considering the tiny life themselves, but it is also a great book for anyone who is interested in learning more about the tiny movement, or anyone who enjoys learning about the world around them. In other words, I think this book would be great for anyone.

I loved the unique topic (I haven't seen any other picture books on going tiny), I appreciated the diversity of having the central characters represented as a beautiful mixed-race family, and I definitely recommend you check out this fascinating story! #ReadYourWorld


~~~


In 2012, bucking societal exceptions and following her inner guidance, B.A. (Beth Ann) Norrgard shed her paralegal costume after 26 years in a downtown high rise and hand-built her tiny house.  She is a passionate advocate for others following their dreams and letting go of societal conditioning, and being free to live a larger life in a smaller space.  BA is a doer.  She has traveled over 14,000 miles with her house and writes about her minimalist, vegan life on her website, banorrgard.com

Rebecca Flansburg is the long-time project manager of Multicultural Children’s Book Day and Head Elf for Audrey Press. She is also an author, freelance writer, and blogger from Minnesota who writes about parenthood topics and being a solopreneur. She is mom to two humans and critter mom to way too many pets. Rebecca credits her quick wit and positive outlook on life for keeping her sane and successful. She is a member of Brainerd Writers Alliance and readers can also find her at BeckyFlansburg.com or on Instagram.

Penny Weber is a full-time illustrator from Long Island, New York, where she’s lived all of her life. She creates digital illustrations that mimic the look of watercolor and traditional painting. Penny attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City where she studied graphic design and illustration. In 2007 quickly signed with Wendy Mays and Janice Onken to be represented by WendyLynn & Company, (www.wendylynn.com). Penny has illustrated many books for the trade and educational market.




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Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2020 (1/31/20) is in its 7th year! This non-profit children’s literacy initiative was founded by Valarie Budayr and Mia Wenjen; two diverse book-loving moms who saw a need to shine the spotlight on all of the multicultural books and authors on the market while also working to get those book into the hands of young readers and educators. 


Seven years in, MCBD’s mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves continues.

MCBD 2020  is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board


Super Platinum


Platinum


Gold


Silver


Bronze


Author Sponsor Link Cloud

Jerry Craft, A.R. Bey and Adventures in Boogieland, Eugina Chu & Brandon goes to Beijing, Kenneth Braswell & Fathers Incorporated, Maritza M. Mejia & Luz del mes_Mejia, Kathleen Burkinshaw & The Last Cherry Blossom, SISSY GOES TINY by Rebecca Flansburg and B.A. Norrgard, Josh Funk and HOW TO CODE A ROLLERCOASTER, Maya/Neel Adventures with Culture GrooveLauren Ranalli, The Little Green Monster: Cancer Magic! By Dr. Sharon Chappell, Phe Lang and Me On The Page, Afsaneh Moradian and Jamie is Jamie, Valerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, TUMBLE CREEK PRESS, Nancy Tupper Ling, Author Gwen Jackson, Angeliki Pedersen & The Secrets Hidden Beneath the Palm Tree, Author Kimberly Gordon Biddle, BEST #OWNVOICES CHILDREN’S BOOKS: My Favorite Diversity Books for Kids Ages 1-12 by Mia Wenjen, Susan Schaefer Bernardo & Illustrator Courtenay Fletcher (Founders of Inner Flower Child Books), Ann Morris & Do It Again!/¡Otra Vez!, Janet Balletta and Mermaids on a Mission to Save the Ocean, Evelyn Sanchez-Toledo & Bruna Bailando por el Mundo\ Dancing Around the World, Shoumi Sen & From The Toddler Diaries, Sarah Jamila Stevenson, Tonya Duncan and the Sophie Washington Book Series, Teresa Robeson  & The Queen of Physics, Nadishka Aloysius and Roo The Little Red TukTuk, Girlfriends Book Club Baltimore & Stories by the Girlfriends Book Club, Finding My Way Books, Diana Huang & Intrepids, Five Enchanted Mermaids, Elizabeth Godley and Ribbon’s Traveling Castle, Anna Olswanger and Greenhorn, Danielle Wallace & My Big Brother Troy, Jocelyn Francisco and Little Yellow Jeepney, Mariana Llanos & Kutu, the Tiny Inca Princess/La Γ‘usta Diminuta, Sara Arnold & The Big Buna Bash, Roddie Simmons & Race 2 Rio, DuEwa Frazier & Alice’s Musical Debut, Veronica Appleton & the Journey to Appleville book series  Green Kids Club, Inc.

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

A Crafty Arab, Afsaneh Moradian, Agatha Rodi Books, All Done Monkey, Barefoot Mommy, Bethany Edward & Biracial Bookworms, Michelle Goetzl & Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of Us, Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes, Educators Spin on it, Shauna Hibbitts-creator of eNannylink, Growing Book by Book, Here Wee Read, Joel Leonidas & Descendant of Poseidon Reads {Philippines}, Imagination Soup, Kid World Citizen, Kristi’s Book Nook, The Logonauts, Mama Smiles, Miss Panda Chinese, Multicultural Kid Blogs, Serge Smagarinsky {Australia}, Shoumi Sen, Jennifer Brunk & Spanish Playground, Katie Meadows and Youth Lit Reviews

FREE RESOURCES from Multicultural Children’s Book Day


TWITTER PARTY! Register here!




Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.